Powdercoat the whole body?

User Is Offline
User Is Offline

insightbrewery

short-throw dipstick
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
67
Reaction score
14
Points
8
 
Hey guys, so when I bought my '99 V6 manual Camry, I had stars in my eyes and didn't notice that there were paint drips on the rear driver door and surrounding area. Doesn't bother me too much, because no Bondo that I can see and panel gaps tell me the car probably hasn't been in any accidents, but it is a former rust belt car, and I will eventually (read: in about 90K) get it painted.

It's Super White, which I think should be reasonably easy to match. My powdercoaters gave me an idea; barring any problems matching the color (far fewer choices when powdercoating, no real blending available that I know of), I can send the stripped chassis to them to powdercoat completely, which will be far more bulletproof than paint could ever be. What you guys think?
 
User Is Online
User Is Online

71Corolla

Site Founder
Super Moderator
Administrator
Joined
Aug 29, 2019
Messages
93
Reaction score
27
Points
18
 
I can send the stripped chassis to them to powdercoat completely, which will be far more bulletproof than paint could ever be. What you guys think?
How stripped? What does this mean exactly?
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

insightbrewery

short-throw dipstick
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
67
Reaction score
14
Points
8
 
Everything that isn't the actual chassis removed: powertrain, suspension, interior, wiring, fasteners, etc.
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

corolapete

Registered User
Joined
Sep 1, 2019
Messages
26
Reaction score
4
Points
3
 
My BIL who works for satellite company they do powder coating. They are very reliable. He introduced this idea to me 2002. He likes it because of durability. He even took my old oven so he could maybe start doing small powder coating at his house. The only question here is how much is the powder coat? I think back when he started powder coating it was still cheap because not many people know about it. I don't know now. Powder coating is definitely better than regular paint as they use it in space.
 
User Is Online
User Is Online

71Corolla

Site Founder
Super Moderator
Administrator
Joined
Aug 29, 2019
Messages
93
Reaction score
27
Points
18
 
Everything that isn't the actual chassis removed: powertrain, suspension, interior, wiring, fasteners, etc.
Sounds awesome if you can pull it off, how would you clean the chassis well enough to be powder coated?
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

insightbrewery

short-throw dipstick
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
67
Reaction score
14
Points
8
 
My BIL who works for satellite company they do powder coating. They are very reliable. He introduced this idea to me 2002. He likes it because of durability. He even took my old oven so he could maybe start doing small powder coating at his house. The only question here is how much is the powder coat? I think back when he started powder coating it was still cheap because not many people know about it. I don't know now. Powder coating is definitely better than regular paint as they use it in space.
I get good rates because we have a good relationship, but I gotta see...I'm guessing $2-3000 normally.

Sounds awesome if you can pull it off, how would you clean the chassis well enough to be powder coated?
Well, they'd clean it - they sandblast the whole thing. For my small parts, I have them vapor blast just for the clean, polished metal look, or before powdercoating (I'll post pics).
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

corolapete

Registered User
Joined
Sep 1, 2019
Messages
26
Reaction score
4
Points
3
 
I get good rates because we have a good relationship, but I gotta see...I'm guessing $2-3000 normally.



Well, they'd clean it - they sandblast the whole thing. For my small parts, I have them vapor blast just for the clean, polished metal look, or before powdercoating (I'll post pics).
Hope you get the rate but I would look into it some more. The powder coat is very durable however it is also hard to repair if its damage and it will. Its not a forever paint. I think its labor intensive. If you don't care about this issues happening later on or you don't care for it to be a show car quality paint then you can go forward. I guess the paint is durable but you have to consider other people hitting your car or road debris chipping your powder coating.
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

insightbrewery

short-throw dipstick
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
67
Reaction score
14
Points
8
 
Ooh, good points; I didn't think about how it would be to repair. I might have to hoof it to Nevada or something and get some environment-destroying lacquer paint job.

Oh, I get 50% from them, I fix all their employees cars. My rate would be $1500.

Hope you get the rate but I would look into it some more. The powder coat is very durable however it is also hard to repair if its damage and it will. Its not a forever paint. I think its labor intensive. If you don't care about this issues happening later on or you don't care for it to be a show car quality paint then you can go forward. I guess the paint is durable but you have to consider other people hitting your car or road debris chipping your powder coating.
 
User Is Online
User Is Online

71Corolla

Site Founder
Super Moderator
Administrator
Joined
Aug 29, 2019
Messages
93
Reaction score
27
Points
18
 
Are you driving your V6 5-speed Camry?
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

foxtherouge

Registered User
Joined
Sep 6, 2019
Messages
21
Reaction score
12
Points
3
 
That would be incredibly labor intensive. You would have to remove literally everything, including glass, to do this. Powder coating is great for something like wheels. But an entire vehicle would be incredibly expensive. You said it's a rust belt car, which means there is going to be rust. All of that will have to be cut and new metal welded in. Then all of your panels would also have to be completely clear of rust for the powder coat to stick. Powder coat chips off when it breaks. I'm not sure on longevity on a vehicle. Constantly getting hit by small particles of dirt and rocks, I imagine it would wear down and chip. Honestly, as great as powder coating is, it's very thin. I'm not sure how it would hold up if hit with enough force to put small dents in your sheet metal. It would be significantly cheaper and easier to just have a shop repaint the car the same color.

You said your rate would be $1500. Is that including stripping the car? Can this shop handle a vehicle, they are fairly large and awkwardly shaped. That would be a huge sand blast cabinet. Does that cost include any repairs?
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

corolapete

Registered User
Joined
Sep 1, 2019
Messages
26
Reaction score
4
Points
3
 
That would be incredibly labor intensive. You would have to remove literally everything, including glass, to do this. Powder coating is great for something like wheels. But an entire vehicle would be incredibly expensive. You said it's a rust belt car, which means there is going to be rust. All of that will have to be cut and new metal welded in. Then all of your panels would also have to be completely clear of rust for the powder coat to stick. Powder coat chips off when it breaks. I'm not sure on longevity on a vehicle. Constantly getting hit by small particles of dirt and rocks, I imagine it would wear down and chip. Honestly, as great as powder coating is, it's very thin. I'm not sure how it would hold up if hit with enough force to put small dents in your sheet metal. It would be significantly cheaper and easier to just have a shop repaint the car the same color.

You said your rate would be $1500. Is that including stripping the car? Can this shop handle a vehicle, they are fairly large and awkwardly shaped. That would be a huge sand blast cabinet. Does that cost include any repairs?
This is what I read too. I believe they use it in space but not for aesthetic reason.
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

insightbrewery

short-throw dipstick
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
67
Reaction score
14
Points
8
 
Are you driving your V6 5-speed Camry?
Yup. They do have a powderclear that I can opt for on top of the colorcoat.

That would be incredibly labor intensive. You would have to remove literally everything, including glass, to do this. Powder coating is great for something like wheels. But an entire vehicle would be incredibly expensive. You said it's a rust belt car, which means there is going to be rust. All of that will have to be cut and new metal welded in. Then all of your panels would also have to be completely clear of rust for the powder coat to stick. Powder coat chips off when it breaks. I'm not sure on longevity on a vehicle. Constantly getting hit by small particles of dirt and rocks, I imagine it would wear down and chip. Honestly, as great as powder coating is, it's very thin. I'm not sure how it would hold up if hit with enough force to put small dents in your sheet metal. It would be significantly cheaper and easier to just have a shop repaint the car the same color.

You said your rate would be $1500. Is that including stripping the car? Can this shop handle a vehicle, they are fairly large and awkwardly shaped. That would be a huge sand blast cabinet. Does that cost include any repairs?
Oh yeah, totally aware - I'd do all that myself, they'd just do the blasting and powdercoating. I specifically bought this car because it was garaged and Fluid-Film'd most or all of its life, and has very little rust for a rust belt car (no cancer, couple edge bubbles on roof and rear left fender.
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

foxtherouge

Registered User
Joined
Sep 6, 2019
Messages
21
Reaction score
12
Points
3
 
So I did a little research. A few people have done a fully powder coated car. The main issue seems to be repairs. It's not like regular paint where you can fade in. If a rock hits the body too hard it will chip which requires that whole panel to be redone. There is also issues with how a vehicle twists, powder coat would start to peel and crack under daily use.

Also keep in mind that our bumpers are not made of metal. So color matching may be difficult since you would have to use a different type of powder.

At the end of the day, it is your car and whatever you choose to with it is all you. Me personally, I would rather invest that money on a good paint job if the car really needed it. I think it's a bit extreme to tear this entire car apart simply because a panel or two have some paint drips, which are easy enough to correct with sanding and repainting/feathering in.
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

insightbrewery

short-throw dipstick
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
67
Reaction score
14
Points
8
 
Yup, you guys have all but convinced me that this isn't the way to go. I missed all the important stuff you all pointed out, and the plastic bumper covers (can't be coated) and the chassis flex are very good points.

Yup, Nevadan paint job it is! Time to get started driving 'til the next next timing belt change when I'll do all this.

So I did a little research. A few people have done a fully powder coated car. The main issue seems to be repairs. It's not like regular paint where you can fade in. If a rock hits the body too hard it will chip which requires that whole panel to be redone. There is also issues with how a vehicle twists, powder coat would start to peel and crack under daily use.

Also keep in mind that our bumpers are not made of metal. So color matching may be difficult since you would have to use a different type of powder.

At the end of the day, it is your car and whatever you choose to with it is all you. Me personally, I would rather invest that money on a good paint job if the car really needed it. I think it's a bit extreme to tear this entire car apart simply because a panel or two have some paint drips, which are easy enough to correct with sanding and repainting/feathering in.
 
User Is Online
User Is Online

71Corolla

Site Founder
Super Moderator
Administrator
Joined
Aug 29, 2019
Messages
93
Reaction score
27
Points
18
 
If I had an ideal way to restore the unibody it would be put the stripped car on a rotisserie, repair/remove any rust then spray with Rust Bullet.
 
Top