Taking All Bets: 1998 Lexus SC400

User Is Offline
User Is Offline

insightbrewery

short-throw dipstick
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
248
Reaction score
48
Points
28
 
Just trying to generate more sections under the Lexus heading.

So I got in this gorgeous 1998 SC400 that has a cold start stalling issue. Only on cold start, it tries to die several times, and sometimes succeeds. Runs great once warmed up (closed loop).

I got it solved. But for the sake of discussion, taking all bets on what it was.

EDIT: feel free to ask questions to get logical, like 20 Questions.
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

insightbrewery

short-throw dipstick
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
248
Reaction score
48
Points
28
 
Aw, no takers? Fiiiine.

Common problem on gen1 SC and MKIV Supra is that the fuel pump ECU goes out. Its job is to drive the fuel pump at either low-speed (9V) or high-speed (12V) operation depending on the engine's fuel demands. Same system whether 2JZ or 1UZ. When it goes out, it gets stuck at 9V when it should be at 12V; fix is to cut and splice together the + output to the fuel pump and the 12V wire from the EFI relay; defaults the pump to 12V operation, like, well, every other Toyota.

BTW, he's selling the car if any of you are interested in an ultra-clean 1998 SC400 (light blue exterior, black interior) with barely 101K on it. Immaculate inside-and-out.
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

71Corolla

Site Founder
Super Moderator
Administrator
Joined
Aug 29, 2019
Messages
279
Reaction score
64
Points
28
 
That's an odd design choice why did Lexus do that? Is it similar to some Toyota's where they have a resistor inline with the pump? Try to make the pump last longer? For the record I would not have guessed the cause.
Aw, no takers? Fiiiine.

Common problem on gen1 SC and MKIV Supra is that the fuel pump ECU goes out. Its job is to drive the fuel pump at either low-speed (9V) or high-speed (12V) operation depending on the engine's fuel demands. Same system whether 2JZ or 1UZ. When it goes out, it gets stuck at 9V when it should be at 12V; fix is to cut and splice together the + output to the fuel pump and the 12V wire from the EFI relay; defaults the pump to 12V operation, like, well, every other Toyota.

BTW, he's selling the car if any of you are interested in an ultra-clean 1998 SC400 (light blue exterior, black interior) with barely 101K on it. Immaculate inside-and-out.
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

insightbrewery

short-throw dipstick
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
248
Reaction score
48
Points
28
 
TBH, since the LS (prototypical application of 1UZ) was designed/reverse-engineered/meant to compete with the S-class (yeah, doesn't come close), I think they were trying to be more "German," i.e have tighter control of all the support systems.

Pontification time: somewhat related, default-map engine control (open loop) on BMWs is waaaaaay tighter than on the average Toyota. It's why on a lot of Toyotas, if you disconnect the MAF the engine won't start, or will die; but on Bimmers, you can disconnect the MAF and it'll throw a code, but switch to the default map and you won't be able to tell that anything is wrong (good for troubleshooting MAF/IAT issues).

That's an odd design choice why did Lexus do that? Is it similar to some Toyota's where they have a resistor inline with the pump? Try to make the pump last longer? For the record I would not have guessed the cause.
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

71Corolla

Site Founder
Super Moderator
Administrator
Joined
Aug 29, 2019
Messages
279
Reaction score
64
Points
28
 
Pontification time: somewhat related, default-map engine control (open loop) on BMWs is waaaaaay tighter than on the average Toyota. It's why on a lot of Toyotas, if you disconnect the MAF the engine won't start, or will die; but on Bimmers, you can disconnect the MAF and it'll throw a code, but switch to the default map and you won't be able to tell that anything is wrong (good for troubleshooting MAF/IAT issues).
Interesting. But on a German car you need all the diagnostic help you can get, in the limited work I've done on them their electrical systems are flaky and unpredictable. I know someone with an X3 that gave up trying to repair it, the dealer failed he took it to a specialist they failed as well. Car throws codes and sometimes dies without warning.
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

insightbrewery

short-throw dipstick
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
248
Reaction score
48
Points
28
 
Haha, you'd be surprised how similar classic (pre-'00's) German cars are to what we normally work on out here. More stuff, sure, but not really more complex.

Now '00's and up German cars, they went somewhat overboard...I've got BMW ISTA and the factory hardware to interface with these cars that have 35-65 computers on board. It all comes down to understanding the logic...the reality is, as much as they're rolling computers, there's very little glitching. They're still cars, the software controls mechanical implements, as knowing this I've never failed to figure out a German car's problem. Probably what keeps me in business LOL

E83 X3's and E53 X5's suck.

Interesting. But on a German car you need all the diagnostic help you can get, in the limited work I've done on them their electrical systems are flaky and unpredictable. I know someone with an X3 that gave up trying to repair it, the dealer failed he took it to a specialist they failed as well. Car throws codes and sometimes dies without warning.
 
User Is Offline
User Is Offline

insightbrewery

short-throw dipstick
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
248
Reaction score
48
Points
28
 
Welp, turns out I was wrong - while it seemed to run great after the fuel pump mod, the guy said the same thing happened two days ago. It'll be back tomorrow.
 
Top